A Community Gathering Place
​​​​​​​​​​John Barrett
Meaningful Jewelry
Berlin, Massachusetts

John has been creating meaningful jewelry since 1970.  He started out, under the guidance of his friend, Frank Geminden, making spoon rings at rock concerts and craft shows. During this time, they met another jewelry maker, Del Schuller, who created jewelry from coins. Del showed them how to drill and cut the metal to create meaningful designs. After moving to Delaware in 1972, John learned how to create Champleve enamels from Douglass Veirity, who was an Australian creating exquisite cloisonné enamels. He worked at a craft workshop in Chads Ford, PA perfecting his Champleve enameling technique. Since that time, John has received several awards for his work that have been sold in many craft shows as well as displayed on Madison Ave in New York City. In total, John brings over 47 years of craftsmanship experience to his jewelry making.  He makes all his jewelry in his home in Berlin, MA. and welcomes customized requests from customers.  

​Judy Dempewolff
Functional, Useful Pottery
Berlin, Massachusetts
When my children left home I decided to try different types of artistic pursuits. I am a Clinical Psychologist, and need something for my own therapy! I did some acting, some drawing and painting, and then tried ceramics. I find that making pottery suits me, since there are many aspects to the process. There is throwing, decorating, mixing glazes, choosing colors, firing the pots. I have a wheel and kiln in my basement, and I also continue to take classes at Community Kiln in Framingham. I am always learning new things.


Joe Iandiorio
Wood Turing & Photography
Bolton, Massachusetts
The joy in turning is that each piece is a surprise.  The type of wood: walnut, maple, mahogany, cherry dictates the grain and hue but only the turning can reveal the rich, unique patterns and colors hidden in the gnarly, neglected stump with which you start.  Sometimes in the eagerness to see what’s hidden that causes a rush can instead result in green wood that warps and splits. 

Photography is a way to capture a motion you see only instantaneously and may never see again.  It is more in the instant than science, more feeling than planning. 


Mary Mikelk
Gourd Creations
Berlin, Massachusetts
My canvas of choice is mainly dried hard-shell gourds. Crafting gourds has been done for thousands of years and are sometimes called, "Natures Porcelain".  Gourds have a look and consistency similar to wood. This means gourds can be cut, carved, sanded, stained, painted, glued, beaded, polished, etched, wood burned (burned into with a pyrography tool), and practically anything else you can imagine.  Each gourd is crafted by nature and artistically refined, each one is distinctive and hand crafted using various materials and mixed media.  Intended exclusively to admire and inspire.

Paul Mikelk
Copper Work
Berlin, Massachusetts
I have always been fascinated by what can be created with metal and copper provides a platform for many different applications.  Texture and sculpting techniques can give a raw piece of copper a unique look and feel.  The addition of patinas unearth the beautiful colorations often seen when copper has been exposed to the elements for years.  Heating copper to various temperatures brings forth an exquisite spectrum of color that makes copper such a unique metal to work with.


Pat Roberts
​Baskets
Berlin, Massachusetts
Basketmaking is a fun hobby, but it requires a lot of time and patience. Over my 40 years of weaving with reed and cane, I have explored with both free form baskets such as the melon basket and mold formed baskets such as the Nantucket Lighthouse baskets. You will see more handmade items at our Holiday Farm Store at 100 Central Street (Route 62) here in Berlin. Please stop by to say hello.  

Mark Smith
Stone Carving 
Berlin, Massachusetts
Taking a stone carving course in Acton in 2012 sent me on an unexpected path. I found great fun, and creativity, and dust in carving a piece of granite in to some whimsical figure. I cannot draw very well, so my ideas come from pictures in old history books and from my own slightly daft imagination. I stare at a rock and ask myself what I could carve from it and then I plunge in. Often the idea morphs as I go along and I take what I think the rock can give me. It is intensely relaxing and stimulating at the same time. A typical piece takes 40 to 60 hours. 




Featured Artist: 
Martin Miller
Photography
All Together Now

Berlin, Massachusetts
Marty Miller has been fascinated with the photographic point of view since picking up his Mom’s Kodak Instamatic 126 in 1965 and trying to squeeze reality into a tiny frame. In 1970, a government sponsored trip to Southeast Asia provided a new context, and Post Exchange privileges provided the photo gear to take that point of view to the next level. A 1979 graduate of Lyndon State College in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom with a BS in Media Communications, Marty developed a style that exhibited a strong graphic sense and favored tight editorial shots. He has been shooting professionally in the Massachusetts metrowest area for over thirty years now, his versatility evident in his advertising and editorial work. At home in Berlin, MA, a community of people who claim their right to farm and value open space, Marty continues to find inspiration.

Artists' Profiles

Open Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Thursday 7-9 pm

Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.​​